How to Conquer the LSAT

How to Conquer the LSAT

Let’s face it – it’s a scary test.  Here’s how to fight back
   
What did our favorite “Legally Blonde” heroine do to prepare for the LSAT?  When asked how she planned to score at least a 175, Elle Woods quipped, “I once had to judge a tighty-whitey contest for Lambda Kappa Pi.  Trust me, I can handle anything.”

Hopefully, if you’re considering law school, your plan of attack for the LSAT is stronger than poor Elle’s.

The LSAT, or Law School Admission Test, can be a daunting exam that requires intense, dedicated preparation.  The pressure to do well on this exam can be real – in addition to your undergraduate GPA, your score on the exam is the most important factor that many law school admissions offices evaluate. 

At Empire College School of Law, the LSAT is not a prerequisite for admission but must be taken within four months of a student’s first day of classes. In addition to the applicant’s LSAT score, consideration is given to life experience, educational background, career history, and other accomplishments.

What is the best way to prepare?  Practice! The LSAT is not an IQ test – the more you practice, the better you’ll do.  Practice will help you become faster (the test is timed), and you will become familiar with patterns that are often repeated throughout the exam. 

How to prepare:

  • Practice with old tests – You can order old LSAT exams from the LSAC.  Always use a stopwatch when you practice so you get used to being timed!  Studying with old tests is highly beneficial but takes time and self-discipline.
  • LSAT prep classes – Depending on your study habits, attending an LSAT prep class may be right for you. If you have trouble with motivation and self-discipline, a prep course may give you the structure and boost you need!
  • Tutoring – Personal tutoring sessions can be a great way to stay dedicated and focused during your studying.  A tutor can also advise you on your strengths and weaknesses concerning the exam.

Typically, students give themselves at least two to three months to prepare by studying three to four days a week for several hours a day.  You never want to feel rushed or unprepared for this exam.  Give yourself enough time to feel confident when test day* rolls around!

* The examination is usually administered in February, June, October, and December. Empire College is a
test center.